Thoughts on “Self-Serving Bias”

If someone were to ask you and your roommate what percent of the work around the house you each do, the answers would almost surely total to more than 100%; you each likely overestimate your contribution. This is an oft-mentioned example of “self-serving bias.”

While I have no doubt that this bias exists, there is one confounding factor that you have to be careful about in attributing such a discrepancy in assessment to self-serving bias, something I have never seen discussed.  That confounding factor is that we value things differently.

My wife, when I was married, used to iron my undershirts after they came out of the dryer.  I asked her not to do it: not only was it a waste of her time because the wrinkles would not be visible, it was also a waste of energy both to iron them and then for the AC to remove the heat from the house.  She saw things differently and continued to iron them.

So when thinking about how much work she did around the house, there were those twenty minutes of ironing she did for me.  But I counted that activity more as an annoyance than as a contribution.

I had another partner who had a curio cabinet with shelves of little glass unicorns and other trinkets on display.  We lived in Phoenix, so all those little pieces needed frequent dusting; in her mind that effort was part of the housework.  But that curio cabinet did nothing for me; it was strictly for her pleasure.  Whatever dusting she did on those unicorns was maintenance on her hobby, as far as I was concerned, comparable to me keeping the tires inflated on my bike.

There can even be discrepancies for work that is valued by both.  For my partner, keeping the kitchen tidy may involve putting on a shelf in the pantry some things that I would prefer to see left on the counter, like the cinnamon and jars of nuts.  Or imagine living with someone who wants the carpets vacuumed every week, when you are fine with once a month.

None of this is to say that humans don’t engage in self-serving bias — just that such discrepancies may also owe in part to discrepancies in what people consider the goal.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: